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The June issue of American Cinematographer is being offered as a special have praised it as one the industry's most influential magazines. Articles. President's Desk: Men in White Suits · Burden of Dreams: The Disaster Artist · ASC Close-Up: Stephen McNutt · Subscribe. Articles. President's Desk: The Fast Shooter · Drones Lend an Antarctic Advantage · A Ghost Story: Haunted House · A Ghost Story: Shared Spaces · The Last.

Our preshoot on Trance was a car sequence we shot with James in a little 2CV in the French countryside.

We had to travel light and keep the filming down low, so I had to find some kind of solution that I hoped could then develop as part of the palette of the film. I brought along the Indiecam, and we clamped it to the car window, adding double-layer reflective surfaces between James and the Indiecam in-camera. From that point on, throughout the shoot, the Indiecams were always near at hand for me to use to appropriate effect; this was often related to a degree of fram- ing or particularly intense close work.

I used three or four Indiecams as in situ placed cameras, always in situations where I knew exactly what the shot was and where the focus had to be. I could often very easily camouflage them in shot while working with other formats simulta- neously, and to achieve this I worked incred- ibly tightly with my key grip, Rupert Lloyd- Parry; my digital-imaging technician, Dan Carling; and my ever-supportive gaffer, Thomas Nievelt. I used only Indiecams C- mount lenses with their cameras, mainly the 8mm, 12mm, 16mm and 25mm, because the joy for me was keeping it small.

But with C-mounts, you really have to select the right focal lengths, fully comprehend their restricted capabilities and then work creatively within those limitations.

See diagram at left. In fact, Arri sent us the very first prototype of the M, and I would say that it and the Indiecam were equally important on this film. We used the M a bit in the 2CV car scene, but it truly came to the fore in the films final car sequence, where Simon, Elizabeth Rosario Dawson and Franck Vincent Cassel drive to the waterfront at night in the rain.

The scene involved pages of dialogue, and we shot it all onstage at 3 Mills Studios. We elevated the car and removed its bottom half, surrounded it with colored LEDs programmed on a chase pattern, and, in Top and middle: Dod Mantle used a mix of cameras during a preshoot with McAvoy in a Citron 2CV in France.

Bottom: The productions Indiecam workflow. We also had rain effects and oil on the windows. We suspended the Alexa M in the middle of the car, attached three monitors on each side of the camera body so I could frame and oper- ate degrees, and shot long takes as well as safety singles and we got it all in one day.

Soon, area codes were added, creating 10 numbers per phone. Precision with language makes us better communicators, and on set, that makes us more efficient and sometimes safer. We have many ways to send words around the world quickly, including e-mail, texting and, yes, even print. A little over a year later, Fincher got in touch again, this time with a project in mind. The camera follows Timberlake and Jay-Z as they get ready for a big show, perform and then wind down at the after party.

Fincher offered opinions on which lights to use, the number of camera carts required and the specific configuration of the camera for a given shot. The camera package and workflow were of particular interest to the director. When attached to the back of the Epic, it provides a wireless p feed for monitoring and wire- less focus control.

The remote-focus motor is still cabled. He used the OLED monitors and histograms at video village to compare exposures between multiple cameras. Higher frame rates were achieved with a compromise between resolution and compression. In post at Light Iron in Hollywood, the image was downconverted to x with a x center extraction.

Conform, visual effects and grading were done on a Quantel Pablo. The filmmakers considered shooting with Cooke lenses, but ultimately chose Zeiss Ultra Primes for their wide variety of focal lengths. He favored the wider focal lengths. Lighting was more a matter of controlling the contrast ratio with negative fill while softening or sharpening artificial light sources. Libatique describes a scene shot on an empty stage where Timberlake plays chess with a showgirl: Direct sunlight was coming through the stage door, so we put Justin and the woman right on the edge of the light, in the shadows.

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When there are cuts between the two locations, the comple- mentary screen directions create the impres- sion of a unified space. Three 1,watt Robert Juliat follow spots were placed on the rear balcony in positions relative to the left, right and center of stage. Libatique switched from one lamp to another to find the opti- mum light for the camera angle.

A matching dance routine is intercut with the story elements, with the perform- ers backed by a chorus line of moving lights. Jay-Z contributes a rap to the second half of the song, and this is interpreted with stylized shots of dancers against mono- chrome backgrounds.

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All of these shots were captured at higher frame rates, and Libatique achieved expo- sure compensation by pulling NDs and widening the T-stop. With each one, he changes planets, and I like that. It also gave us another chance to work with Mark Tildesley, a phenomenal production designer. So, I never really hesitated. Danny and I prefer to be on a real location, and a lot of intu- itive work goes on as we explore locations with the production designer.

I find this phase of a project really creative and inspiring. It took me a while to drill my way into Trance, and the best way we could do that together was by standing in the spaces, talking about the characters and looking at surfaces. Many of these images survived from the first recce through to being almost perfectly replicated in the final film.

These small experiments during prep sometimes summon new ideas that, in turn, create artistic themes and rules for the film at hand. Eventually, we also decided to use reflections to ease the audience into trance scenes, when Simon slips into a hypnotized state. I suspect this was an idea I had started developing for a 3-D film that never materialized. The idea lingered, waiting to rear its head at an appropriate moment.

But late in prep, Danny clarified that he did not want to overstate the slipping-into- trance moment, and he wanted to make graphically clear the slipping-out-of-trance moment. We decided to use lens flares for the latter. So the idea of using the dual- Indiecam rig faded, but I was still keen to find a use for them. This has sometimes given us frightening moments, as we are so often on the edge of breaking camera technology and happily so. Our preshoot on Trance was a car sequence we shot with James in a little 2CV in the French countryside.

We had to travel light and keep the filming down low, so I had to find some kind of solution that I hoped could then develop as part of the palette of the film. I brought along the Indiecam, and we clamped it to the car window, adding double-layer reflective surfaces between James and the Indiecam in-camera.

From that point on, throughout the shoot, the Indiecams were always near at hand for me to use to appropriate effect; this was often related to a degree of fram- ing or particularly intense close work. I used three or four Indiecams as in situ placed cameras, always in situations where I knew exactly what the shot was and where the focus had to be. I could often very easily camouflage them in shot while working with other formats simulta- neously, and to achieve this I worked incred- ibly tightly with my key grip, Rupert Lloyd- Parry; my digital-imaging technician, Dan Carling; and my ever-supportive gaffer, Thomas Nievelt.

But with C-mounts, you really have to select the right focal lengths, fully comprehend their restricted capabilities and then work creatively within those limitations. See diagram at left.

In fact, Arri sent us the very first prototype of the M, and I would say that it and the Indiecam were equally important on this film. The scene involved pages of dialogue, and we shot it all onstage at 3 Mills Studios. We elevated the car and removed its bottom half, surrounded it with colored LEDs programmed on a chase pattern, and, in Top and middle: We also had rain effects and oil on the windows.

We suspended the Alexa M in the middle of the car, attached three monitors on each side of the camera body so I could frame and oper- ate degrees, and shot long takes as well as safety singles — and we got it all in one day. It was exhausting, and it was difficult for focus off the monitor with me correcting and pulling as well.

I always have a handheld rig on standby so that I can pop in and do some- thing different, and I find the Alexa Studio and Plus to be physically inhibiting outside the conventional on-the-shoulder handheld technique, so I was keen to get the M. For me, the wrong camera move is equivalent to an actor changing language in the middle of a take! We found that linear moves and a lot of lateral tracks suited Trance.

We used Hawk V-Lite 1. The Hawks are beautiful, but close focus in the 32mmmm range can be a little frustrat- ing for handheld and Steadicam work, so I supplemented with a few spherical lenses: I maintain a permanent creative dialogue with Canon regarding develop- ment of their new technology.

Simon gradually opens up to his hypnotherapist Rosario Dawson. Simon threatens Franck Vincent Cassel in this frame grab from the climactic scene. James wore the C as a body rig as he climbed up. Another scene shows Simon leaving Elizabeth alone in a taxi.

It had to be shot in very short time in a real taxi, and I used the C handheld from the front seat. I find postproduction to be the most creative part of filmmaking, and Trance gave me an opportunity to work once again with colorist Jean-Clement Soret, my collab- orator on 28 Days Later …, Millions, Slum- dog Millionaire and Hours [AC Dec. It was a very busy three weeks at Tech- nicolor London.

Danny is a devil at changing the edit up to the last day of the grade, but if this makes the film better, then I am always happier. Danny is a director who comprehends the immense advantage of being on hand or close at hand with graded images and final mixed sound in the edit, when filmmakers can get those last-minute creative ideas that lift a film further.

The grade is an incredibly creative space if the right people are sitting in with the right atti- tude. During the course of the grade and final edit, Danny always comes in with a few essential points that I keep in the back of my mind throughout the process.

Danny always bangs on about this, as he is aware that some of his films have challenged audi- ences in that respect. Sometimes one simple sentence is cut across time into three or more different locations or spaces.

Now, I generally light for mood. So, Jean-Clement and I spent an enormous amount of time working on the windows for eyes, trying to enhance access to the thoughts or moods of the three main characters.

Trance is fundamentally a humorous but intelligent, demanding exer- cise in a modern Hitchcock framework. There is a deliberate ambivalence to some actions. The audience has to pay attention in order to separate the lies from the truth, and the clues are all in the faces of the actors. It was an enormous task to protect and enhance this idea in the grade.

Of course, there are some ambi- tious, inexplicable cuts from the Alexa straight to the Indiecam, and I get it in the face, really! Overnight, the color of his skin and his Muslim faith transform him into a perceived threat. Back in Lahore, he comes under the influence of militant Islamists and finds himself torn between love and hate for America. Quinn, who does his own operating, shot most of the picture on an Arri Alexa Studio with a 4x3 sensor , using a lens package that included Cooke S4 primes, a set of Zeiss Superspeed primes, an Ange- nieux Optimo mm T2.

He notes that he has used his Cooke zoom on nearly all of his features. We just removed much of the corrugated-metal roof, erected a simple truss grid and hung a byfoot frame of bleached muslin. Gels varied the color of the sunlight.

I wanted the light around the actors to be really soft and natural, so we often would diffuse it again with a loose rag of Half Soft Frost really close to the actors, smearing the light just a bit more.

Highlights in the eyes become much punchier on digital than they do on film.

It can look almost vampire-like, and the layer of Half Soft Frost helps to create a much softer, more natural-looking glow in the eyes. We always tried to shoot close to wide open, somewhere between an f2. I knew we would feel it on a few wide landscape shots, though, so we brought three ArriRaw Codex mags and used them for those shots.

I use long lengths of latex surgical tubing and hang it from the highest point possible, using webbing and carabiners to attach the camera and fine-tune its hang point. If the camera hovers about 3 feet off the ground, I can move it 5 or 6 feet in any direction with almost no effort. Musicians play at a backyard party in Pakistan. It just takes practice. Bending over a long eyepiece, Quinn could do an over-the-shoulder, push into a single or just improvise as the actors played the scene.

Quinn used dollies for the long open- ing sequence, which takes place at night and cuts back-and-forth among various characters and locations, generating a sense of foreboding. The montage starts at a backyard party in Lahore, where guests are seated on the ground listening to music, and it ends with kidnappers grabbing the Amer- ican professor off the street, throwing him into a car and speeding off. We spent the rest of the evening doing cover- age, using two cameras and shooting wide open.

The B camera, an Alexa Studio equipped with the Optimo, was operated by Indian cinematographer Shanker Raman, who improvised from a dolly and 40' of track.

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Your eye falls on one spot in the frame, and the rest is kind of smeared, so the image has a slightly myste- rious quality. To illuminate the large yard, his crew placed small Fay bulbs or nook lights to uplight trees and foliage to create depth.

The minimal fill was created by small fixtures, candles and torches scat- tered around the space. New York exteriors were shot in Manhattan, while interiors were filmed in Atlanta, Ga. In one scene, Quinn had to do a tracking shot down the length of the loft as Erica and Changez enter the apartment and move through patches of light and shadow.

It gave a sense of streetlight coming in and projected the window frames onto the walls. We used Lee [Straw Tint] gels in front of the lights as our streetlight color. Jackson, and all of his Atlanta and New York crewmembers. I find that with digital cameras, the color information from middle gray to black is weak; the amount of chroma data seems to correlate directly with luminance data, so in the darker areas of the image, there is very little color information to work with.

Joe and I worked to build color contrast in the shadows to give the image more film-like depth. Every morning for an hour or so, they lead the crew in yoga. The benefit is energy, health and flex- ibility. Filmmaking is hard on people — the long hours can beat you down. Yoga bolsters your spirit and gives you extra strength when that 12th or 13th hour comes along.

Thanks to Mira, yoga has become an important part of my life. Next to him is key grip Sanjay Sami, and at far left wearing hat is gaffer Mulchand Dedhia. This page, top: Harper maneuvers through unknown territory. Julia Olga Kurylenko joins Harper after she is found in a downed spacecraft.

Kosinski left and Miranda line up a shot. I n Oblivion, which is set in the year , the Earth lies in ruins from an alien invasion that happened several decades earlier. The surviving humans have long since been evacuated, and robot drones patrol the planet, searching for any remaining resources that can help the human race. Jack Harper Tom Cruise has been tasked with repairing the drones, and as his assignment draws to its close, he is shocked to stumble upon another human, a woman Olga Kurylenko , in a downed spacecraft.

Suddenly, he is attacked by a group of humans, the Scavs, and taken captive. Legacy AC Jan. Production began in March , three months after Sony began shipping its F65 digital-cinema camera, and Oblivion became one of the first features to use it.

He liked what the [Sony] F35 gave us on Tron, and he was really a fan of the F65 in our tests for Oblivion. When we wanted to put body mounts on Tom Cruise or do quick Steadicam moves, we used Red Epics instead. But about 98 percent of the movie was shot with the F The camera is positioned inside the set, which was surrounded by a '-wide- by'-tall projection screen that enabled interactive sky effects. Projection programmer Jack Alexander controls the sky onstage.

When I did side-by-side lens tests in prep, I found the Fujinons are actually sharper than the Master Primes, which was hard to believe! We had all four of them: A couple of shots called for a telescope point-of-view, and we put a doubler on the mm, giving me an mm. Miranda recalls that he and Top: The camera crew works in front of the projected background.

Using the concept of frontscreen projection, he proposed surrounding the set with projection screen and utilizing high-end video projectors to create the sky all around the set.

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Production Resources Group, a company that specializes in concert tours and other specialized events, brought in 21 Barco FLM- HD20 20,lumen HD projec- tors, along with 11 custom Mbox Extreme v3 media servers, to create a degree projection around the entire set. It was ' wide by 42' tall; more than 60 layers of video were combined to create a final blended image resolu- tion of 18, x pixels.

All of the footage played back at about triple normal speed, so the clouds had a little extra dynamic energy to them.

If we wanted to change the sun direction, we simply called up a different clip, or borrowed one part of the scene from the other side of the projection. We could flip and flop cloud formations around [to achieve] the most dynamic looks, and we could get it all in-camera in real time.

Harper accidentally discovers the remnants of the New York Public Library. I actually used the light from the projections for much of the lighting in the sky tower. It gave us a huge source that was very beautiful natural light. We could deal with some distortion from time to time because we were projecting clouds, which are very forgiving, but if there were any visible seams, we were dead. That was right on the hairy edge of where I was getting exposure, but if I wanted to increase that, we would have needed twice as many projectors, and that was out of the ques- tion.

The next task was determining where to place the projectors, and the filmmakers found that mounting them directly under the set worked best. Custom housings were created for each projector that allowed cool air to be pumped in and featured a small aper- ture for the lens to poke out.

Individual mirrors were mounted at each projec- tion port so the beam could be adjusted — panned and tilted — without requir- ing an adjustment to the position of the projector or the housing. Miranda recalls that it took 10 technicians nearly three weeks to install the projectors and get them all synced and custom-warped to the shape of the projection wall to create a seam- less image.

Another bonus to avoiding blue- screen composite was that Miranda was free to incorporate atmosphere in the set. The light interacted with it in a very real, beautiful way. Miranda operates the wheels on a remote camera control. Would it look good if the clouds were always moving? In the end, the result is really amazing. We hid white cards around the set and asked Tom to hit them, and we also had grips moving around with muslin sheets to reflect light.

It lies underground, buried by rubble and debris from the war, so Harper descends into it through a hole in the ceiling. A shaft of daylight coming through the hole lights the scene. Interestingly, we had to shoot this before we went to Iceland to shoot the exteriors, so I had to guess what the light quality would be like. The crew employs a crane to get a shot of Cruise on location in Iceland. Kosinski front consults with Miranda second from right and other crewmembers.

Then, when we see Beech for the first time, he lights himself with a single match. We just moved Tom a little closer, kept him lit with the LED lamp and got that beautiful reflection. Hundreds of people stand in the rafters around the room. Some architectural lights were worked into the set for this moment, but keying the crowd was a large soft box overhead holding six Kino Flo Image 80s. Miranda says he prefers to incorporate the B camera as additional coverage after the A camera is set.

We did it for a couple of scenes between Tom and Olga so we could capture both performances in the same shot. This gave Miranda the ability to create what- ever hue of interactive lighting he desired. I wanted them moveable so we could adjust them around to the right angle on the action. Longer sliding plate with quick release offers extra balancing control.

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If they were spinning in the canyon, we could easily shift to sidelight. When Harper fired, the lights would erupt with interactive plasma bursts. Technicolor colorist Mike Sowa brought a Discreet Lustre to the site so Miranda could work side-by-side with Kosinski as the director moved back- and-forth between sound mixing and color sessions.

They set us up in housing, and I had my family up there with me, so it was a very comfortable and relaxing way of work- ing. It was a wonderful way to finish off the great experience I had on this film. The smallest camera makes the biggest images. Now I shoot RED. Subjected to racist taunts by Cleveland Indians manager Ben Chapman Alan Tudyk , Robinson storms into the tunnel leading from the dugout to the locker room and vents his rage with a baseball bat on a concrete wall.

The lighting was inspired by the way Brian wrote the scene. I worked with [production designer] Richard Hoover on the design of the tunnel because it was important that Chadwick stand in the sweet spot so the lighting effect would work.

Richard built one solid piece of wall, so that was the only place in the tunnel where Chadwick could swing his bat and break it. This was a good example of how a cinematographer works with the production designer in prep. There were some practicals in the tunnel, but it was the 18K coming through, with bounce cards, that did the trick. The white light came straight off the floor as a shaft of sunshine would.

At the same time, Helgeland wanted the look of the movie to be relatable for modern audiences. Don suggested evolving the look into a more modern one as the story progresses [from to ]. Robinson joins his teammates in the locker room. General manager Branch Rickey Harrison Ford speaks with Robinson after his bat- smashing moment of rage.

Burgess has used Red Digital Cinema cameras on several recent projects, and he decided almost immedi- ately to shoot 42 with the Red Epics and Zeiss Ultra Prime lenses. It was sort of like the old days, when you started with the work print and sat with the timer to go over it.

That gave us a guide. Robinson keeps his eyes on the ball. This series of frame grabs illustrates the layers that cinematographer Don Burgess, ASC and colorist Corinne Bogdanowicz applied to the image during the final grade at Light Iron.

The audi- ence should get a sense of rawness or uncertainty without being hit over the head. The look of the movie is other- wise so elegant that the handheld moments were all carefully thought out so as not to stick out visually.

He used a compression rate of 5: Filmmakers viewed images on set on OLED monitors, and waveform monitors were used to judge exposure. Most of the picture was shot outside in the South, where cloud cover- age can vary by the minute, so each take had to be graded separately to create an even look. Typically, each day at lunch, the film- makers watched dailies on a 4'x6' screen in the trailer. Helgeland and Burgess decided to maintain a mobile camera using a mix of handheld, Steadicam and dolly work in order to achieve multiple goals.

Hall, ASC. There is an ensemble around Paul Newman in that movie, and we tried to have an ensemble around Jackie Robinson. We were shooting wide enough to see the sets, letting actors perform with their whole bodies, and trusting the audience to look where we wanted them to look.

We shot minimal coverage. The crew utilized circular track for a shot of Boseman at the plate. Daylight is reflected off bounce boards and the camera is positioned on the "golf rocket" — an electric golf cart — for a shot along the baseline.

If he is moving, the camera is moving. If he is running the bases, the camera is right in his face, leading him around the bases. I like to use a remote head on the camera a lot, to keep it moving, and there is also great Steadicam work. Top right: Middle and bottom: A Red Epic was positioned beneath Plexiglas for shots of Boseman sliding into base. Some of the baseball action required longer focal lengths, but I stayed wider as much as I could.

Brightening that dingy space with streams of light whenever Rickey opened the blinds was important thematically, says Helgeland.

Rickey loves baseball, but segregated baseball makes him feel there is something unfair about something he loves, so signing Robinson and address- ing the issue is like shining a light of truth on the matter. And because it was a tungsten set, we had everything on dimmers. We used cranes, dollies, handheld, cradle rigs and electric carts. We could handhold it while hanging off a golf rocket going 20 mph, all while maintaining a quality image.

On occasion, Moriarty even attached his Steadicam to the vehicle with a Garfield mount to film Robinson rounding the bases. So, it was a matter of hanging the camera off the front or back of the golf rocket, or holding a Kleven cradle rig [named for veteran stunt director Max Kleven], which gave us a lightweight handheld unit we could hang just above the ground. All the base- ball action was filmed at three Minor League stadiums: Rickwood Field in Birmingham, Ala.

Of course, many backgrounds, walls, fences, poles, crowds and signage had to be created digitally by the visual- effects team, which was supervised by Jamie Dixon.

The GoPros recorded at 48 fps in x to capture the maxi- mum field-of-view. In the end, the GoPro frames were used to track about a dozen shots out of roughly , according to Dixon. We fine- tuned color, saturation levels and contrast to elaborate on the ideas we put in place during the shoot.

I used unique qualifiers [with Quantel Pablo] to sepa- rate the skin tones and individual elements of the frame. K www. The Celeb features dial-in white light from to Kelvin and presets with programmable settings.

Light levels do not change when selecting Kelvin settings. The Celeb also includes full range dimming without color shift. The result is a very unique blend of vintage and modern looks. Though much in the film is propelled by history, it taps into magic realism and metaphor as it navigates four generations, 17 main characters, 64 locations and 60 years of political turmoil. The filmmakers shot 3-perf Super 35mm, and Nuttgens tapped Take 2 in London for his camera package: At first, Mehta and Nuttgens thought the epic story called for chore- ographed camera moves and sophisti- cated dolly work, and the production brought in dollies and track from England.

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But at the last minute, they decided to go handheld. For me, the actors dictate where the camera will be. Most of my night work was lit with Chinese lanterns or Kino Flos, and we built a lot of that ourselves.

Saleem stands in his classroom. Parvati Shinova Soni gathers with other children. That takes us through the period set in Pakistan and up to the Bangladesh war at the begin- ning of the s.

Night scenes were generally covered with [Vision3 T] , which allowed us to work with a limited amount of light but still get enough depth-of-field to give the first AC a chance to keep the image sharp, despite a handheld camera that varied its placement on every take. Children of various ethnicities materialize out of thin air, and they seem lit from within — a metaphor for hope, says Mehta.

It was important that it feel organic. Zulfikar Rahul Bose, second from right. The tower where the children gather had four windows on each side, making it a much brighter space than Nuttgens had in mind. The third look is Endless Night, which encompasses the period of polit- ical oppression from , when Prime Minister Indira Gandhi suspended civil liberties and authorized mass arrests and torture. Would it be black-and-white? Deep gray and white? Giles did a number of tests, and we decided the look that felt right was an almost teal gray.

That made the grain stronger, so you start to see the texture in the lower mid-tones. Instead of keeping the mid-tones clean, you muddy them up a bit. So, my handheld work became limited, as I kept banging up against the back wall. Occasionally I would try to jib up from a kneeling position, and the weight of the camera would drag me down again. By building them side by side, we could link them visually, increasing the size of our shooting location signifi- cantly. Once the bulldozers moved in, that was it.

There were no retakes. That was enough to fully expose them. To capture another angle, a second camera unmanned was posi- tioned next to one of the buildings that were destroyed. At that point in the story, he has endured family rejection, exile and amnesia from an air-raid injury. He spots Parvati among the entertainers at a military victory parade, and he moves to the ghetto to live with her.

The trick to that was to make sure there was a good, solid negative within that space.

Though white light would have been easier to match, Nuttgens often made use of Straw, Yellow and Amber gels, especially in night interiors. Mehta and Fleming completed the final pass because Nuttgens was already on his next project.

Once you start shooting, you can really go for it, and that gives the actors a huge sense of freedom. It is divided into three parts: DMX Basics The DMX protocol, or DMX for short, was created in by lighting professionals who wanted to give manufacturers and users a simple, universal digital standard for lighting control. DMX was adopted throughout the industry, and became formalized in It was a night- mare before DMX.

It is a digital signal protocol; it defines the syntax of a signal that is sent by light- ing controllers to fixtures and peripherals such as dimmers. The DMX protocol defines a universe as channels.

A Lighting professionals explain how DMX technology has transformed soundstage work.Students, staff and faculty are welcome. Plug into televisions or video projectors for instant on set preview or get exciting live action replay with ATEM production switchers. This series of frame grabs illustrates the layers that cinematographer Don Burgess, ASC and colorist Corinne Bogdanowicz applied to the image during the final grade at Light Iron.

Projection programmer Jack Alexander controls the sky onstage. The Facility 7-Day Risk-Standardized Hospital Visit Rate after Outpatient Colonoscopy measure will be publicly reported beginning on or after December 1, and will be used for payment determination beginning calendar year Article Reprints: Imagine using pristine uncompressed recording on your next live event! I actually used the light from the projections for much of the lighting in the sky tower.

Eventually, we also decided to use reflections to ease the audience into trance scenes, when Simon slips into a hypnotized state.

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